When one has a brood of hens working hard to provide organic wonders, that person has no need to color “white” eggs.  In fact, as we found out, the variation of color in our hen’s eggs allowed for a deeper and richer end egg product this last Easter.

A collection of our hen's hard work.

 

A collection of our hen’s hard work.

You may first notice that our hens lay a variety of colors (light brown, dark red, blue and green).  With these as a set of base colors, any additional color deepens in color, providing a richer color.

We tried to use natural coloring this year.  We cooked a beat, brewed some coffee and boiled an artichoke.  The coffee made a weak tan, the beat made an oily mess on the egg and the artichoke’s green, although nicely hued, didn’t take.

A blue egg with some additional blue hue.

A blue egg with some additional blue hue.

So, we went old-school.  Using the traditional vinegar-based egg coloring, with the handy little metal wire holders, plastic cups and wax crayons, we began to deepen the naturally occurring colors.

A blue egg turning green, with a "franken-egg" thrown in for contrast.

A blue egg turning green, with a “franken-egg” thrown in for contrast.

The blue, as you can see in the image, turned out a deep and dark royal blue.  Far from messing up the colors, the natural egg color enhanced the dye in a strong and engaging way.

Since we colored our eggs at the grandparents’ house, we had to accommodate Grandma’s fear that we wouldn’t have enough eggs to go around, what with Aunts and Cousins coloring.  So, the white eggs, bought from the local grocery chain, served as a good contrast to the power of our colored-eggs coloration.

Once we had the base colors, sparkles, wax accents and all of the other coloring fun could be added.  The results are seen below.  But I had to move quickly because not only are the final eggs visually impacting, they were delicious as well.

A basket full of colored goodness.

A basket full of colored goodness.